CANON AE-1
My favorite photographic subjects are urban landscapes. The way humans alter the natural is interesting to me. Urban landscapes change much quicker than other landscapes and
it's easy to see history in urban landscapes. I've been part of that history.

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SECTION OF THE MIRACLE MILE

Tucson Arizona's "Miracle Mile," was once a thriving business area.  From the 1930's until the late 1950's it was a gateway into Tucson. Motels and restaurants lined the route.

When Interstate 10 was completed in the early 1960's, it became the route into Tucson. The Miracle Mile fell onto hard times.

Hard looking people were wandering where we'd parked our car. We keep a watchful eye on them.




AMAZON MOTEL

My favorite Miracle Mile motel name. I'll bet the rooms had jungle themed wall paper. Its sign, like others of its time, had style. Now businesses all look the same.




GHOST RANCH LODGE AND RESTAURANT

The Ghost Ranch is a hanger-on. It's well maintained and likely losing money.




MONTEREY MOTEL

The NO VACANCY sign is lit at The Monterey.



RIVIERA MOTOR LODGE
Despite its seductive name and low rates, The Riviera doesn't seem to be doing well. The building to the left gave up the ghost some time ago.



There's a nice bowling alley on The Miracle Mile. What is it that's funny about bowling ?



TERRACE MOTEL

Tucson is strewn with large, empty, commercial lots. They are everywhere. Here's one next to The Terrace. The lot is littered with the bones of the building that once stood next there.

End of Miracle Mile
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TUCSON INN
The Tucson Inn is well maintained and is bucking the trend toward homogenization. Its sign reminds me of the interior of a typewriter. The arrow wrapped around the word "INN" shows you where the office is.
Toss the Coke machine, Tuscon Inn guy.



Same cars as the previous photo. Probably employees.




YES, A VACANCY

This sign is a work of art. An exemplary piece of art deco America. Multiple fonts. Rounded edges. Interesting colors and glass block.
It'll be the makings of a Toyota one day.




LA SIESTA MOTEL

There are a number of things that are interesting about La Siesta's sign.
The red strips above the "La Siesta Motel" signage are supposed to represent the red bricks which are featured throughout the motels landscaping. A nice touch.

The sleeping Mexicans certainly date the place. Today you'd be called a racist for such a generalization.  I've seen a few Mexicans and they were awake.

I don't recall air conditioning being referred to as "refrigerated." I'd guess that's a 1940's term. It certainly makes more sense that "air conditioning."

Conditioning is something one does to ones hair.  Well, I don't but I see conditioner in my bathroom so I assume somebody does.

The yellow part of the sign is modern. I think it sucks. Somebody probably through a brick through the original sign. It wasn't a Mexican though.







PUEBLO HOTEL AND APARTMENTS

Refrigerated with a swimming pool. The very height of modern accommodations.

A couple of years ago, I gave a friend of mine who lives in Tucson, a crappy camera. She photographed this old building in black and white. As I drove by it with my son a few weeks ago, I remembered the photograph
 and had to take a picture myself. I like K's better.




PLEASE USE THE INTERCOM



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I try to figure out what was in old buildings like this. Someone spent years doing something here. Was it a shoe store ? An ice cream shop ? A drug store ? A bowling alley ?
A bowling alley... now that's funny !




BUILDING DETAIL

Kodak Ektar 100 film
Canon AE-1 with f2.8 20mm and f 1.4 50mm lenses.
Processing done by Phototec - Rutland, Vermont